Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area (IBA)

The Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area, or IBA, is "critical" to the survival of Short-eared Owls in New York State!  These endearing medium-sized owls flock to the IBA in winter. They are active during daylight hours, primarily at dusk and dawn.  They can be seen almost any evening, frequently greeting each other in swoops and dives before starting to hunt!

The IBA offers an "all you can eat" buffet for many other raptors and songbirds!

Friends of the Washington County Grasslands Important Bird Area (Friends of the IBA, for short) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit working with willing landowners to conserve critical habitat in this unique IBA!  The group founded and organizes Winter Raptor Fest, a fun and educational event and fundraiser that draws thousands of people to the heart of the IBA in March.  

Learn more about Friends of the IBA and upcoming events and activities - including bird walks and owl watches - at www.ibafriends.org and www.winterraptorfest.com

ECOLOGY
Raptors like Short-eared Owls and Northern Harriers (threatened) depend on the IBA’s vast, open expanses of grasslands to accommodate their low aerial hunting style. The IBA provides abundant populations of the small mammals (mice, shrews and voles) that are their primary prey.

The Washington County Grasslands IBA provides “exceptional” breeding and wintering habitat for these state endangered owls and almost a dozen threatened, at-risk and rapidly declining grassland bird species.  The grasslands area encompasses hay fields, meadows, wetlands, streams and small woodlots.  This rich and diverse habitat attracts over 200 bird species in all!

HISTORY

The 2,000 acre Important Bird Area (IBA) lies primarily within the town of Fort Edward, with portions in Argyle and Kingsbury.  It is at the heart of the 13,000 acre Washington County Grasslands, a primarily agricultural complex extending from southern Washington County to the foothills of the Adirondacks in the north.  

It received National Audubon's IBA designation in 1997.  The designation identifies areas that support endangered bird species or "significant" populations of breeding and wintering birds, but comes with no protection.  The Washington County Grasslands IBA does both.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) officially acquired almost 300 acres of critical habitat from The Nature Conservancy in October 2013.  There is now a parking area and trail head, and half mile one way trail will maintained starting Spring of 2014.

Friends of the IBA is working with New York State D.E.C. and other nonprofits to conserve this vital habitat through conservation easements or land purchases from willing sellers. However, the remainder of this core area remains unprotected.

Read more

Location

Collapse
Nearby
Latitude: 43.283203 Longitude: -73.530624 Elevation: 157 ft
the best travel advice comes from the people who live here
Laurie LaFond

Primary Access Points And Trail Heads

Much of the Washington County IBA is private property.  Visit the Friends of the IBA website for a schedule of guided walks, owl watches and upcoming events.

Wildlife Species Often Seen

At-Risk Species

Eastern Meadowlark

Horned Lark

Upland Sandpiper

Northern Harrier

Short-eared Owl

American Kestrel

Commonly Seen Grassland Birds

Bobolink

Savannah Sparrow

Snow Bunting

Rough-legged Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Eastern Bluebird

Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher, Yellow Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Turkeys, Canda & Snow Geese and dozens more!

MAMMALS: nearly every species of native mammals!  
Common:  Deer, Red Fox, Wood chuck, coyote, muskrat, beaver, skunk, opossum...

Best Seasons And Times For Viewing

See the Friends of the IBA schedule.

Best birding generally between January and June

Don’t Miss This When Visiting

Roger's Island Visitor's Center

Related Sites Or Experiences

birding is great from one end of Washington County to the other!  

Friends of the IBA will be adding more trips as we gain volunteers...

Tours Are Offered

yes

Site is Child-friendly

yes

Leave a Comment

Submit